SOUTH LODGE

BELLEISLE PARK

Located at Belleisle Park in Ayr, this lodge from... ETC MORE Context. Click here to add your own text and edit me. It’s easy. Just click “Edit Text” or double click me to add your own content and 

Grand Grade

South Lodge has a Grand Grade score of 0.72

Grand Bequest calculates the suitability, or ‘Grand Grade,’ that can be used to sort projects by viability and strengthens objective communication, supports decision-making, and promotes resource allocation to the most ideal projects for conservation taking into account aspects such as cultural significance, social benefit, financial sustainability and adaptability.

Learn more about Grand Grades here.

Cultural Significance

Social Benefit

Financial Sustainability

Adaptability 

SLH_001_sunny_ph.jpg
SLH_002_sunny_ph.jpg

How we think South Lodge could be adaptively reused. What do you think?

Get involved

Help us decide which use should the South Lodge at Belleisle Park. See the images we have proposed and join the discussion in our App.

More about the building's grand grades

Cultural Significance

 

HISTORY

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.


However, it is likely that Torwood Castle was built or altered to reflect the political position of the owner in the case of Clan Foresters of Garden this could have been to reflect their  royal connections through both Duncan Forrester’s position as Comptroller of the Royal Household for James VI and the use of timber found on the Forrester’s land for the King’s artillery. This could be further seen by the likelihood of the reconstruction of the rectangular forecourt of ancillary buildings on the north side of the castle in 1635. The castle would further become politicised in 1585 when it would be captured and turned into a site of rebellion prior to the successful siege of Stirling Castle by the Earls of Mar and Angus, and again when the Forresters of Garden became associated with the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715. Torwood Castle’s link to independence is not surprising as the Forest itself is said to have been the location of Wallace’s oak where plans for independence from King Edward III were discussed.

ARCHITECTURE

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.


However, it is likely that Torwood Castle was built or altered to reflect the political position of the owner in the case of Clan Foresters of Garden this could have been to reflect their  royal connections through both Duncan Forrester’s position as Comptroller of the Royal Household for James VI and the use of timber found on the Forrester’s land for the King’s artillery. This could be further seen by the likelihood of the reconstruction of the rectangular forecourt of ancillary buildings on the north side of the castle in 1635. The castle would further become politicised in 1585 when it would be captured and turned into a site of rebellion prior to the successful siege of Stirling Castle by the Earls of Mar and Angus, and again when the Forresters of Garden became associated with the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715. Torwood Castle’s link to independence is not surprising as the Forest itself is said to have been the location of Wallace’s oak where plans for independence from King Edward III were discussed.

DSC_3682.JPG
DSC_3612.JPG
DSC_3595.JPG

social benefit

 

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.


However, it is likely that Torwood Castle was built or altered to reflect the political position of the owner in the case of Clan Foresters of Garden this could have been to reflect their  royal connections through both Duncan Forrester’s position as Comptroller of the Royal Household for James VI and the use of timber found on the Forrester’s land for the King’s artillery. This could be further seen by the likelihood of the reconstruction of the rectangular forecourt of ancillary buildings on the north side of the castle in 1635. The castle would further become politicised in 1585 when it would be captured and turned into a site of rebellion prior to the successful siege of Stirling Castle by the Earls of Mar and Angus, and again when the Forresters of Garden became associated with the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715. Torwood Castle’s link to independence is not surprising as the Forest itself is said to have been the location of Wallace’s oak where plans for independence from King Edward III were discussed.

financial sustainbility

 

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.


However, it is likely that Torwood Castle was built or altered to reflect the political position of the owner in the case of Clan Foresters of Garden this could have been to reflect their  royal connections through both Duncan Forrester’s position as Comptroller of the Royal Household for James VI and the use of timber found on the Forrester’s land for the King’s artillery. This could be further seen by the likelihood of the reconstruction of the rectangular forecourt of ancillary buildings on the north side of the castle in 1635. The castle would further become politicised in 1585 when it would be captured and turned into a site of rebellion prior to the successful siege of Stirling Castle by the Earls of Mar and Angus, and again when the Forresters of Garden became associated with the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715. Torwood Castle’s link to independence is not surprising as the Forest itself is said to have been the location of Wallace’s oak where plans for independence from King Edward III were discussed.

adaptability

 

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.


However, it is likely that Torwood Castle was built or altered to reflect the political position of the owner in the case of Clan Foresters of Garden this could have been to reflect their  royal connections through both Duncan Forrester’s position as Comptroller of the Royal Household for James VI and the use of timber found on the Forrester’s land for the King’s artillery. This could be further seen by the likelihood of the reconstruction of the rectangular forecourt of ancillary buildings on the north side of the castle in 1635. The castle would further become politicised in 1585 when it would be captured and turned into a site of rebellion prior to the successful siege of Stirling Castle by the Earls of Mar and Angus, and again when the Forresters of Garden became associated with the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715. Torwood Castle’s link to independence is not surprising as the Forest itself is said to have been the location of Wallace’s oak where plans for independence from King Edward III were discussed.

DSC_3682
DSC_3682

DSC_3612
DSC_3612

DSC_3595
DSC_3595

DSC_3682
DSC_3682

1/3

LOCATION

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.