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This is our vision for the South Lodge. Let us know your thoughts!

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Get involved!

Help us to create renderings for different vacant buildings and contribute to get these buildings being brought back to life! In return, we will promote your work on our App and social media and you could even be part of the project team when the project goes ahead.

Help us decide which use should the South Lodge at Belleisle Park. See the images we have proposed and join the discussion in our App.

Are you an Architect or a 3D Artist? 

South Lodge has a Grand Grade score of 0.72

Grand Bequest calculates the suitability, or ‘Grand Grade,’ that can be used to sort projects by viability and strengthens objective communication, supports decision-making, and promotes resource allocation to the most ideal projects for conservation taking into account aspects such as cultural significance, social benefit, financial sustainability and adaptability.

Learn more about Grand Grades here.

Cultural Significance

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Financial Sustainability

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Social Benefit

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Adaptability

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More about the building

HISTORY

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.


However, it is likely that Torwood Castle was built or altered to reflect the political position of the owner in the case of Clan Foresters of Garden this could have been to reflect their  royal connections through both Duncan Forrester’s position as Comptroller of the Royal Household for James VI and the use of timber found on the Forrester’s land for the King’s artillery. This could be further seen by the likelihood of the reconstruction of the rectangular forecourt of ancillary buildings on the north side of the castle in 1635. The castle would further become politicised in 1585 when it would be captured and turned into a site of rebellion prior to the successful siege of Stirling Castle by the Earls of Mar and Angus, and again when the Forresters of Garden became associated with the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715. Torwood Castle’s link to independence is not surprising as the Forest itself is said to have been the location of Wallace’s oak where plans for independence from King Edward III were discussed.

ARCHITECTURE

As emphasised within the Statistical Accounts of Scotland 1845 Torwood Castle’s history is “involved in much obscurity”. Such obscurity is evident in the origin of the Castle alone. Estimated to have been built around 1566 for Sir Alexander Forrester the castle is part of the Torwood estate, a royal hunting ground and forest, which is believed to have been owned by the Clan Foresters of Garden from the mid 15th -17th century. However, statistical accounts actually believe that the Castle was long in possession of the Baillies who were also proprietors of Castlecarry in North Lanarkshire, and only then through marriage did it become home to the Clan Foresters of Garden.


However, it is likely that Torwood Castle was built or altered to reflect the political position of the owner in the case of Clan Foresters of Garden this could have been to reflect their  royal connections through both Duncan Forrester’s position as Comptroller of the Royal Household for James VI and the use of timber found on the Forrester’s land for the King’s artillery. This could be further seen by the likelihood of the reconstruction of the rectangular forecourt of ancillary buildings on the north side of the castle in 1635. The castle would further become politicised in 1585 when it would be captured and turned into a site of rebellion prior to the successful siege of Stirling Castle by the Earls of Mar and Angus, and again when the Forresters of Garden became associated with the Jacobite Rebellion in 1715. Torwood Castle’s link to independence is not surprising as the Forest itself is said to have been the location of Wallace’s oak where plans for independence from King Edward III were discussed.

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LOCATION